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Three ways to create your own dream team
28 March 2014 Posted by 

Three ways to create your own dream team

By Tony Eades
Chairman Sydney Hills Business Chamber

FOR a small business, a productive and inspired team can make a monumental difference to the bottom line.

When there are less than 20 individuals involved, any discontent in the team can quickly affect everyone, causing distraction, reduced productivity, and even the loss of good team members who may go looking for a more positive work environment.

But a happy and inspired team that shares your vision for the future of the business is likely to help you grow and prosper.

So how can you create your own business dream team?

Recruit team players

Start at the very beginning – look for good team players amongst job applicants. Team players are those who are confident enough in their own skills that they’re willing to share their expertise for the good of the team, and encourage others.

They learn from others too, because they understand that everyone has different strengths that can be used to full advantage in a team situation.

When talking about their successes, they’re likely to say “we” often. Soloists on the other hand, may sound confident, but in fact are a little insecure.  They may have difficulty sharing the credit with a team.

Encourage sharing

While an individual’s personality will have a lot to do with how well they perform in a team, much will also depend on your leadership.

If you view your employees as a team, expect (and allow) them to work as a team, and encourage sharing, then even individuals who have not previously worked well in a team situation might begin to find the team environment very welcoming and rewarding.

What’s to share? It’s important to share your vision for the future of the business. Everyone likes to have something exciting to work towards.

Many business challenges can be shared too – the most amazing solutions can arise from ideas being thrown around by a team.

The team members’ different skills and ways of looking at problems combine to tackle the challenge, often resulting in an innovative solution, or a whole range of new ideas to be tried and tested.

Reward

If you subscribe to the view that a weekly pay packet should be sufficient reward for good work, you’ve probably wasted your time reading this far.

The occasional “thank you so much” or “that’s fabulous, well done!” can have a bigger impact on someone’s performance and happiness at work than a $50 a week pay rise. The first is free - the second will cost you $2,600 a year per person.

Rewarding your whole team can contribute to building the team spirit too and it’s so simple to do.

The occasional lunch at a restaurant to celebrate a special achievement, or even just a luscious cake delivered for a morning tea treat. It really is the thought that counts in this situation.

For team building, consider participating as a team in a local charity event, or a recreational activity that provides a reward and challenge for the team.
Chamber events

My regular readers may have guessed by now that the Sydney Hills Business Chamber theme for April happens to be ‘team building’. Why not bring your team to one of our events?

Gold medallist Stephanie Rice is the featured guest at our next business breakfast on 9 April. We also have a Chamber Golf Day once a month at the Riverside Oaks Golf Resort.

You don’t have to be a Chamber member to attend events. For more details and booking options, visit the events page at www.sydneyhillsbusiness.com.au



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